Why you should know CPR

Why you should know CPR

Did you know that CPR saves 92,000 lives every year? That’s a staggering number and is just one of the many reasons why you should know CPR. You don’t need to be a doctor or health care professional to know CPR or how it can save lives. It is a very useful skill to have and can help you in many different types of emergency situations. It is also a skill that anyone can develop without professional training or a medical degree.

According to the American Heart Association, CPR can double and even triple a person's chance of survival after cardiac arrest. This is just one of the many reasons that you should consider learning CPR. Not only can you help save a life, but you can learn a valuable life skill, expand your knowledge, and do your part in making a difference.

What is CPR?
CPR, also known as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, is a type of life-saving, emergency procedure which is

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9 Important Documents created by every Business Analyst (Part 2)

Documentation is one of the integral job functions of a business analyst and he, throughout the course of a project, prepares many documents. These documents are created to fulfill the varied project needs and cater to audiences belonging to different spheres of a project.

The type and specifications a business analyst is expected to create in an organization depends upon many parameters like organization’s processes and policies, need and expectations of the business, and the stakeholder requirements. Detailed below are the common documents a business analyst is expected to create and they are extensively used throughout the course of a project. Each of these documents has a specific template and it’s a part of the overall project documentation. The documents are:

  • Project vision Document

  • Requirement Management Plan

  • User stories

  • Use cases

  • Business Requirement Document

  • Requirement traceability matrix (RTM)

  • Functional requirement specification (FRS)/ Functional Specification Document (FSD)

  • System requirement specification (SRS)/ System Requirement Document (SRD)

  • Test case

Let’s discuss the second part of these documents in details, as we discussed 4 of these important documents last week.

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9 Important Documents created by every Business Analyst (Part 1)

Documentation is one of the integral job functions of a business analyst and he, throughout the course of a project, prepares many documents. These documents are created to fulfill the varied project needs and cater to audiences belonging to different spheres of a project.

The type and specifications a business analyst is expected to create in an organization depends upon many parameters like organization’s processes and policies, need and expectations of the business, and the stakeholder requirements. Detailed below are the common documents a business analyst is expected to create and they are extensively used throughout the course of a project. Each of these documents has a specific template and it’s a part of the overall project documentation. The documents are:

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What is a Work Breakdown Structure?

The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) is often seen as the foundation of the project. Why is this so? This is because the Work Breakdown Structure reflects the entire scope baseline of the project, such that deliverable not incorporated into the WBS will not be part of the project.

What then is the WBS?

The WBS is a deliverable-oriented, functional decomposition of the project scope of work into hierarchically grouped work elements. The WBS shows the breakdown of work components (deliverable) into hierarchical levels resembling an organisational chart, but don’t be confused; it is NOT an organisational chart.

It serves a much different function from an organisational chart.

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4 Unavoidable States for all Successful Products and Services

Successful products and services start out as a basic project deliverable.

Deliverable go through 4 main states, According to the PMBOK 6, these are:

  1. The Deliverable

  2. The Verified Deliverable

  3. The Accepted Deliverable

  4. The Final Product, Service, or Transition

When do these states happen?

Manage and Direct Project Work:

The third process under the Integration Management Knowledge Area is the process where the deliverable is first created. It is very important to remember this. The deliverable, that first version of the product/service is created in Manage and Direct Project Work. This means that after we finish the Manage and Direct Project Work, we can boast of:

▪The completed building

▪The completed car

▪The completed iPhone X

▪The completed film footage

▪The completed manuscript for the novel

Manage and Direct Project Work gives us a first completed version of the product of the project. It is called the Deliverable.

Control Quality

The third process of the Quality Control Knowledge Area is where

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Another Tricky Question from the PMP Exams (And Why 99% of People Fail It)

Today's question would perhaps be all the more shocking, but pay attention, because hidden behind these tricky questions and answers are the fundamental and unshakable principles of project management.

Let's deal with the second question:

Question: 
You are managing a software development project, and one of the developers tells you that he added a new feature that he heard the sponsor talking about in a hallway conversation. The developer did the work after hours and it does add a lot of value to the solution. How should you manage this?

Options:

A) Thank the developer for his hard work and communicate this as a ‘win’ in your next status report.

B) Document this as a Change Request and follow the Change Control process to ensure it is documented and approved.

C) As there were no costs incurred from the work and no schedule impact, you do not need to do anything.

D) Tell the developer to immediately back the change out as it was not approved and explain that any scope changes must be reviewed and approved before implementation.

What's your answer?

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How to Identify and Source Business Needs for Analysis

Business analysis work begins with the discovery of a business need. Business needs are problems or opportunities of strategic importance to the organisation.

A good example of a business need that can trigger a comprehensive BA work would be: customers from certain parts of the world experiencing slow performance on a website that they have paid to have access to premium content.

If the complaints reach a certain level, they can become business needs that may trigger an assessment for possible changes.

According to the BABOK, business needs can come from a variety of internal and/or external sources including the following below.

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Is Project Management the Most Practical Profession Ever?

I make it a “point of duty” to point out to my students and clients on project assignments how much project management is practical rather than conceptual.

Practical according to the online Oxford Dictionary is defined as: “of or concerned with the actual doing or use of something rather than with theory and ideas”.

Quite a chunk of career and professional development is steeped in ideas and concepts – management disciplines, business analysis, and several others are known to be concerned with the building of conceptual models.

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The PMP Exam Question NOBODY Gets Right (You'll Be Surprised Why)

The Question

John is managing a project. He conducted a risk assessment workshop with project stakeholders and  identified several risks. He is concerned about the amount of time it will take for quantitative and  qualitative risk analysis and to develop a risk response plan. What should John do?

A) As the risks were identified by project stakeholders, John needs to ensure that each risk follows the risk management processes.

B) John should use his expert judgement to decide which  risks warrant more complete risk analysis and response.

C) John should create a Probability and Impact matrix that determines risk thresholds for quantitative and qualitative risk assessments. He should apply this to his Risk Register and use that to determine which  risks need analysis and risk responses.

D) John should refer this decision to the project stakeholders who  can determine which risks merit response.

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8 Essential Business Analysis Questions for a Successful Elicitation Session

“Guiding” elicitation means to think of the right questions to ask to obtain the desired outcomes from elicitation.

To achieve this clarity and focus, the business analyst needs to keep 8 important questions in mind while conducting his elicitation sessions. Think of these as the “eight essential business analysis questions.”

They are:

1.       What are my elicitation activity goals and agenda?

2.      What is the scope of the change?

3.      What type of output will each activity produce?

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9 Great Reasons to Choose a Project Management Career

When I met project management as a career, it was love at first sight. I already had an extensive background in banking, which was much more operational, and I was looking for something different to do with my life, plus some degree of independence.

I stumbled on project management, and it has always met my expectations for an ideal career, surpassing it, and enabling me have all the independence, fulfillment and satisfaction I need. These very points are what I intend to share with you about Project Management, and why it is a great career choice for you.

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5 Project Management Techniques to Avoid Project Failure

What is Project Failure?

project is considered a failure when it has not delivered what was required, in line with expectations. Therefore, in order to succeed, a project must deliver to cost, to quality, and on time; and it must deliver the benefits presented in the business case.

Remedies:

1. Manage the goal.

In avoiding project trouble the phrase “a stitch in time saves nine” has never been more correct. Manage scope (do not try to control it), document the decisions (never rely on an understanding), and give users what they need (rather than what they want). Delivering to the original scope, schedule, and budget is far from a guarantee of a successful project. It is essential to work with the customer and ensure the project delivers value.

2. Educate the Customer: Nothing is free.

There are three parameters that control a project—scope, schedule, and budget. Trying to edict all three is the definition of a failure waiting to happen. Only two of these attributes may be set; the other is derived. Educate the customer (and maybe some corporate executive) on these constraints and how they work.

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